Pit Stop No4: The World Mining Congress

Mining is not only about mines and digging deeper; it is an exciting world that joins the exploration activities, the environmental services, the mining suppliers and the investment departments. In order for the mining industry to remain global and up to date on the leading edge technologies, an international committee is responsible of organizing the World Mining Congress (WMC).

This international congress brings together thousands of delegates from around the globe. It is a high-level knowledge sharing and networking event that gathers exhibitors in mining as well as in automation, robotics and construction. Each congress has a motto from which revolves its technical program of peer-reviewed papers.

The 23rd WMC was hosted in Montreal by the Canadian Institute of Mining (CIM) in collaboration with five professors from major Canadian universities. This WMC was held in conjunction with the ISARC 2013, the International Symposium on Automation and Robotics in the Construction and Mining Industries. The exhibition hall presented more than 250 mining industry related manufacturers and service providers.

Autochthones  were invited to perform at the 23rd WMC in Montreal

First Nations were invited to perform at the 23rd WMC in Montreal

Prof. Ferri Hassani is one of the five professors to help in organizing the 23rd WMC

Prof. Ferri Hassani is one of the five professors to help in organizing the 23rd WMC

The next WMC will be held in Rio de Janeiro in 2016 and will be organized by the IBRAM, the Brazilian Mining Association. It will be located at the prestigious Sul América Convention Center.

N.B: Polish mining engineer Prof. Boleslaw Krupiński initiated The World Mining Congress when he organized the first congress in 1958 in Warsaw. He remained chairman until 1972. Today, the WMC is a UN-affiliated organization and is run by the permanent secretariat seated in Poland.

Advertisement

Pit Stop No1: Jeffrey Mine

The haul road can be seen cutting the benches diagonally.

The haul road can be seen cutting the benches of the open-pit diagonally

Located in the heart of Asbestos city in southeastern Quebec, Jeffrey Mine started production of chrysotile or white asbestos in 1879. Chrysotile is the most common form of asbestos belonging to the serpentine group of phyllosilicates minerals. The mineral asbestos attracted the industrialists of the 90s due to its numerous properties. Over the years, the dangers associated with various forms of asbestos were identified lowering the demand for this mineral worldwide. The Quebec government has stopped funding the mining of Asbestos shutting down the largest mine of the region: Jeffrey Mine. This open-pit and underground mine reached a depth of 350 m. Today, the pit no longer exists as it has been reclaimed.

Two students holding  asbestos fibers

Students holding asbestos fibers

The chrysotile ore is transported from underground to the surface in this lift access

The chrysotile ore is transported from underground to the surface in this lift called a skip